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ARTICLE soft tissue therapy .com.au

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Title
Effects of experimental leg length discrepancies on body posture and dental occlusion

Author(s)
Maeda N, Sakaguchi K, Mehta NR, Abdallah EF, Forgione AG, Yokoyama A.

Published
Jul, 2011

Published In
Cranio. 2011 Jul;29(3):194-203.

Abstract
The purpose of this study was to quantitatively evaluate the effects of experimental leg length discrepancies on body posture and dental occlusion. Thirty asymptomatic subjects (15 males and 15 females, ages 19-33, mean age 25.6 years) were included in this study and randomly assigned to one of two groups based on a table of random numbers. The only difference between group A and group B was the sequence of testing. Experimental leg length discrepancies were provided by using ten types of insoles with heights ranging from one to ten mm at one mm intervals, placed under both feet. The MatScan (Nitta Corp., Osaka, Japan) system was used to measure changes in body posture (center of foot pressure: COP) while subjects maintained the following three postural positions: 1. natural standing posture (control); 2. control with a heel lift under the right foot; or 3. control with a heel lift under the left foot. The T-Scan II system (Nitta Corp., Osaka, Japan) was used to analyze the results of changes in dental occlusion (center of occlusal force: COF) in the above-mentioned three postural positions. When subjects used a heel lift of six mm or more under the right foot, lateral weight distribution (LWD) shifted to the right side compared to the control (p<0.05). When a heel lift of four mm or more was used under the left foot, LWD shifted to the left side compared to the control (p<0.05). When subjects used a heel lift of eight mm or more under the right foot, occlusal force shifted to the right side compared to the control (p<0.05). When subjects used a heel lift of seven mm or more under the left foot, occlusal force shifted to the left side compared to the control (p<0.05). Based on these findings, it was concluded that leg length discrepancy affected body posture and dental occlusion.

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